Finding Creative Direction Mini-Interview: Micah LidbergBack with our second Mini-Interview with an artist I really admire, Micah Lidberg. He’s a super nice guy and an online buddy of mine. Micah has an incredibly high level of craft and exudes creativity which is as moving and as it is unexpected. Micah’s answers were very thoughtful, and I think there is a lot to take from them, here they are:

1. How did you decide to do illustration / design?
I sort of evolved into illustration. As a kid, I made stuff and drew a lot. All through grade school, if you were creative in any way, you’re taught classic fine art. Design, or any other creative field, is generally absent. So I had a typical fine art education before college. I chose to go to the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and that’s when I had my first exposure to illustration as it’s own discipline. It fit with a lot of my interests, and seemed pretty open and experimental, so I decided to make it my major. From there, it gradually progressed into a profession.
2. You have such a high level of craft. Was there any point in the early days of development where you questioned if you were doing the right thing, spending time investing in this one direction?
I don’t recall really considering that or not. When I was developing my work I wasn’t thinking in practical terms. For instance, how much time it takes to generate ideas, draw them to completion, color, etc… I was just following what felt right, or at least, what felt interesting. I’ve always tended towards the elaborate, so I’m not surprised by the route I took. I think now that I’m doing it as a business, some of the more practical concerns have come into view. Ultimately, I think both practicality and dreaming are important. You need one to give you a direction, and the other to get you moving. 

3. What’s your advice for young creatives out there?
Stick to it! Don’t give up, and look for balance in life. I think working hard is really important if you want to achieve your goals. However, one of the most powerful and meaningful things young creatives can have is happiness and contentment. Some of that can and will come from work, but not all of it. There’s so much more to life than work, and I encourage people (young creatives and otherwise) not to forget that. 
4. Do you struggle with anything in your work? (i.e. creativity? ideas? technology? business? etc.)
I struggle with lots of things in my work. I’m not sure if people see that when they look at illustrators, designers or other creative professionals. They usually just see the end result. But everyday is something new, and everyday brings things that you’re not quite sure how to handle. It’s funny, out of your list, I’d say I struggle with all of them. Ultimately, I think that’s a good thing. Struggle helps us learn and grow. It can be too much at times, and it’s important to avoid burnout, so I try to be practical and work with my limits. 

5. Where do you want to see your work going long term?
I’m not exactly sure where I see my work going, but I’m excited to find out! Lately, I’ve been wanting to tell stories in a different way than I have been. I think motion and sequence will be a big part of that and maybe some three dimensional work. My technical skills are more print based, so I have a few learning curves ahead of me. But it should be a fun process!Micah thanks again for the awesome thoughts and for taking time to answer them for all the readers here on my blog. I super appreciate it. 
Visit Micah’s website here: http://www.micahlidberg.com/What in particular in Micah’s answers intrigued you or stood out to you?

Finding Creative Direction Mini-Interview: Micah Lidberg

Back with our second Mini-Interview with an artist I really admire, Micah Lidberg. He’s a super nice guy and an online buddy of mine. Micah has an incredibly high level of craft and exudes creativity which is as moving and as it is unexpected. Micah’s answers were very thoughtful, and I think there is a lot to take from them, here they are:

ml1

1. How did you decide to do illustration / design?

I sort of evolved into illustration. As a kid, I made stuff and drew a lot. All through grade school, if you were creative in any way, you’re taught classic fine art. Design, or any other creative field, is generally absent. So I had a typical fine art education before college. I chose to go to the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and that’s when I had my first exposure to illustration as it’s own discipline. It fit with a lot of my interests, and seemed pretty open and experimental, so I decided to make it my major. From there, it gradually progressed into a profession.

2. You have such a high level of craft. Was there any point in the early days of development where you questioned if you were doing the right thing, spending time investing in this one direction?

I don’t recall really considering that or not. When I was developing my work I wasn’t thinking in practical terms. For instance, how much time it takes to generate ideas, draw them to completion, color, etc… I was just following what felt right, or at least, what felt interesting. I’ve always tended towards the elaborate, so I’m not surprised by the route I took. I think now that I’m doing it as a business, some of the more practical concerns have come into view. Ultimately, I think both practicality and dreaming are important. You need one to give you a direction, and the other to get you moving. 

ml2

3. What’s your advice for young creatives out there?

Stick to it! Don’t give up, and look for balance in life. I think working hard is really important if you want to achieve your goals. However, one of the most powerful and meaningful things young creatives can have is happiness and contentment. Some of that can and will come from work, but not all of it. There’s so much more to life than work, and I encourage people (young creatives and otherwise) not to forget that. 

4. Do you struggle with anything in your work? (i.e. creativity? ideas? technology? business? etc.)

I struggle with lots of things in my work. I’m not sure if people see that when they look at illustrators, designers or other creative professionals. They usually just see the end result. But everyday is something new, and everyday brings things that you’re not quite sure how to handle. It’s funny, out of your list, I’d say I struggle with all of them. Ultimately, I think that’s a good thing. Struggle helps us learn and grow. It can be too much at times, and it’s important to avoid burnout, so I try to be practical and work with my limits. 

ml3

5. Where do you want to see your work going long term?

I’m not exactly sure where I see my work going, but I’m excited to find out! Lately, I’ve been wanting to tell stories in a different way than I have been. I think motion and sequence will be a big part of that and maybe some three dimensional work. My technical skills are more print based, so I have a few learning curves ahead of me. But it should be a fun process!

Micah thanks again for the awesome thoughts and for taking time to answer them for all the readers here on my blog. I super appreciate it. 

Visit Micah’s website here: http://www.micahlidberg.com/

What in particular in Micah’s answers intrigued you or stood out to you?